Reverberate supports true stereo processing; this is an area that can sometimes be a little confusing and this page provides a brief summary of the modes of operation supported by Reverberate. Three topologies for convolution are provided by Reverberate and are available for use within each of the two impulse response convolution units. The IR units are termed IR1 and IR2 and each of these can load two stereo impulse responses when in true stereo mode (termed IR1-A, IR1-B, IR2-A and IR2-B).

Modulation of the outputs from the true stereo convolution units within the mixer means two true stereo impulse responses (using a total of four stereo impulse response files) can be modulated for highly dynamic and rich reverb effects. The convolution units operate in any of the following modes.

Parallel Stereo

The left input channel is convolved with the left impulse response file channel and the right input channel is convolved with the right impulse response file channel. This is the typical configuration for stereo convolution reverbs when used with stereo impulse responses, although when input audio is panned left or right, using Mono to Stereo may provide more intuitive results.

True Stereo

The left input channel is convolved with the left and right impulse response file channels from IR1-A and the right input channel is convolved with the left and right impulse response file channel from IR1-B. The two output convolutions’ respective left and right components are then summed into a single stereo output. This configuration is necessary to take full advantage of true stereo impulse responses. True stereo impulse responses are required to be provided as two separate stereo files and loaded into IR1-A and IR1-B (or IR2-A and IR2-B). This configuration is typically found in high-end algorithmic reverbs.

Mono to Stereo

The left and right input channels are mixed to mono and then independently convolved with the left and right impulse response file channels. When using a single stereo impulse response file, this is useful when input audio is panned hard left or right; this configuration is often encountered in low/medium-end stereo algorithmic reverbs.